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Thursday, November 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the blue Mountains found in the catalog.

Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the blue Mountains

Kent B. Downing

Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the blue Mountains

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Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth.,
  • Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.)

  • Edition Notes

    Prepared in cooperation with USDA Douglas fir tussock moth program.

    StatementKent B. Downing, Phillip B. Delucchi, William R. Williams.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper PNW -- no. 224., USDA Forest Service research paper PNW -- 224.
    ContributionsDelucchi, Philip B., Williams, William Roy., Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.), United States. Forest Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination14 p. :
    Number of Pages14
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17882167M

      Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth. Flourishing in forests as far north as British Columbia, as far south as the United States border, as far west as the Pacific coast and as far east as the eastern edge of Colorado, the Douglas-fir tussock moth naturally populates an extensive environment.


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Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the blue Mountains by Kent B. Downing Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the Blue Mountains. [Kent B Downing; Phillip B Delucchi; William R Williams; United States. Department of Agriculture.; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.); United States.

Forest Service.]. Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the Blue Mountains [Oregon]. Author(s): There was little evidence of significant or long term influence of tussock Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the blue Mountains book infestation on recreation activity.

Only 7% of summer visitors had avoided infected areas before or in the year of : K. Downing, P. Delucchi, W. Williams. Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are all equally acceptable. In the south (California, Nevada, Arizona, and Figure 1. -- Distrubution of host type where Douglas-fir tussock moth may be found and location of outbreaks. trees, brush, and buildings, but once an outbreak subsides, finding caterpil-lars is difficult.

Defoliation by the tussock moth. Most Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks occur east of the Cascade Mountains crest in mixed conifer stands having high proportions of Douglas-fir, grand fir, or white fir.

In northern Washington, Douglas-fir is the preferred host, while elsewhere in Washington and Oregon, Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are equally preferred. Orgyia pseudotsugata, the Douglas-fir tussock moth, is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae first described by James Halliday McDunnough in It is found in western North America.

Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to : Insecta.

Tussock Moth caterpillars (from the family Lymantriidae) are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests. The best-known member of this family is the beautiful but highly detrimental Gypsy Moth which is not native to North America.

After its introduction, the potential for destruction these critters could wreak became all too clear. Douglas-Fir tussock moth has been most prevalent in our landscape trees but is also in forested areas on Cheyenne Mountain and on Rampart Range Road.

Spruce budworm has surged in forested areas such as Cheyenne Cañon, Cheyenne Mountain and along Rampart Range Road. It can also move into our landscape Spruce and Fir trees. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator. Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior.

Severe defoliation by the tussock moth may result in tree mortality, top-kill or weakened trees, making. Kent Downing has written: 'Impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth on forest recreation in the Blue Mountains' -- subject(s): Douglas-fir tussock moth 'Urban owners of forests in western Oregon.

The Forest Entomologist with the Thompson Okanagan Region, Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO) states we are experiencing the start of a Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak throughout the region.

She checked out our area a week ago and found evidence of the natural virus in the population. If private land owners want. Douglas-fir Tussock moth virus (TM Biocontrol-1) Wild populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth have several naturally-occurring diseases that cause mortality to certain life stages of the insect during the course of an outbreak.

The agentsnucleopolyhedrosis virus (NPV) that cause these diseases are bacteria, fungi, and viruses, among others. Successful management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth depends on carefully monitoring populations within high-hazard stands during the non-outbreak and building phases.

Once an outbreak begins, viable treatment options decrease significantly. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars feed on needles of spruces, Douglas-fir and true firs Sporadically outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth occur in several Front Range communities. Less commonly it occurs as a forest pest in Colorado.

Numerous natural enemies attack Douglas-fir tussock moth and these will often control. Lymantria means "destroyer", and several species are important defoliators of forest trees, including the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar, the Douglas-fir tussock moth Orgyia pseudotsugata, and the nun moth Lymantria monacha.

They tend to have broader host plant ranges than most Lepidoptera. Most feed on trees and shrubs, but some are known from Class: Insecta. Impact & Damage. Outbreaks usually occur every 10 to 12 years and typically last for two to four years.

Severe defoliation by the Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth may results in rapid tree mortality due to extremely high levels of defoliation. The larvae are wasteful feeders and consume the base of needles of both new and old foliage discarding the rest.

Douglas-Fir Tussock Moths Author: W. Cranshaw, I. Aguayo, and D.A. Leatherman Subject: Douglas-fir tussock moths are important defoliators of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region. The insects cause serious aesthetic damage. initiated by the U.S.

Forest Service and Oregon and Washington state forestry agencies. It was soon ap- parent that the caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth were chewing on vast acreages of trees in cer- tain areas of the Blue Mountains, extending 70 miles north.

This study compares the effects of separate Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgiapseudotsugata McDunnough) and western spruce budworm (Choristoneuraoccidentalis Freeman) infestations on the radial growth of two host species, grand fir (Abiesgrandis (Doug.)Lindl.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii (Mirb.)Franco).

Growth records from nonhost species were also examined to Cited by: Phenology of white fir and Douglas-fir tussock moth egg hatch and larval development in California. Environmental Entomology. 5: Wickman, Boyd E. Tree mortality and top-kill related to defoliation by the Douglas-fir tussock moth in the Blue Mountains outbreak.

Res. Pap. PNW Portland, OR: U.S. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia. It is not an introduced species.

It feeds primarily on Douglas-fir, and occasionally on ponderosa pine and western larch. Ornamental spruce and pine may also be affected in urban.

• Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars feed on needles of spruces, Douglas-fir and true firs. • Sporadically outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth occur in several Front Range communities.

Less commonly it occurs as a forest pest in Colorado. • Numerous natural enemies attackin close association with the spot where they Douglas-fir tussock.

Impact of the first recorded outbreak of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, in southern California and the extent of its distribution in the Pacific Southwest region. An outbreak of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough, occurred in the South Platte River drainage on the Pike-San Isabel National Forest in the Colorado Front Range attacking Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco.

Stocking levels, species composition, and tree size in heavily and lightly defoliated stands were by: 1. Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) and Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura hebenstreitella) Populations of these two defoliating caterpillars continue to expand this year in the Colorado Springs area.

Blue Spruce, Douglas Fir and White Fir are hosts to these insects. Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM) population increases were first detected through traps set in cooperation with West-wide DFTM Early Warning Pheromone Detection Survey in By the USDA Forest Service Forest Entomologist in Sonora observed defoliation around Crane Flat.

Forest entomologists say it’s been a banner year for tussock moths, a native pest that strips green foliage from fir trees. The moths are in their caterpillar stage, actively feeding on Douglas.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region. Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees.

Damage usually appears first in the tops of trees and progresses downward, sometimes over several years. th0 Douglas fir tussock moth in the Pacific fior4hwe/t A SEMINAR SEMINAR CHAIRMAN Henry J. Korp Deputy Assistant Administrator for Pesticide Programs U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency PROGRAM COMMITTEE Roger Pierpont, Entomologist Ecological Effects Branch, Criteria and Evaluation Division Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency Washington. The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough) defoliated Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var glauca [Beissn.] Franco), in British Columbia from to Forest Health Alert Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata): Outbreak status of a conifer defoliating caterpillar Importance.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM) is a defoliating caterpillar that can severely damage Douglas-fir, true fir, and spruce trees in the western United States.

In eastern. Abstract. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is a common defoliator of fir in the interior forests of western North America.

It is one of four western species of Orgyia, but it is the only member of the group that occasionally reaches outbreak numbers while feeding exclusively on conifers. 24 Because of the explosive and destructive nature of its outbreaks, the Cited by: “Currently, the Douglas fir tussock moth outbreak on the Front Range is also changing the condition of the forest and will result in increased wildfire risk,” Thompson said.

The chemical. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Management Strategy Southern Interior Forest Health Program Lorraine Maclauchlan, Ph.D. Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, Thompson Okanagan Region Columbia Street Kamloops, B.C.

V2C 2T3 The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, is a cyclical defoliator of Interior Douglas. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, O. pseudotsugata, feeds primarily on Douglas-fir and true firs.

Lighter-colored tufts of hair along the back, red spots on top, and an orange stripe along each side distinguish its mature larvae from those of the rusty tussock moth. Life cycle. Tussock moths overwinter as eggs.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars recently left several campers in the Sage Hen recreation area with allergic reactions and skin irritation. Author: Shirah Matsuzawa Published:.

The Douglas Fir Tussock Moth during seasons of severe outbreak often cause extreme defoliation of spruce, Douglas fir and other true fir species of evergreen trees. Damage starts at the top of the tree and trees encountering multiple seasons of infestation will receive substantial damage leaving them susceptible to bark stinging insecttles and.

The tussock moth’s caterpillar feeds on the short needles of spruce, Douglas fir and true fir infestation typically begins at the top as the insects work their way down, munching.

populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth. Forest Science Objectives: To derive and compare two models for estimating density from p; and to determine which is most versatile over a wide range of larval ages and densities.

Abstract: The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a major defoliator of Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.). Douglas-fir Tussock moth has been located in several locations throughout the reservation. The moth is a defoliator (eats and damages the needles) that feeds on Douglas-fir, true fir, and spruce trees.

This pest is one of the easiest to identify.Douglas-fir tussock moth egg masses in British Columbia. Joint Rep. Canadian Forest Service, Pacific Forest Research Centre. 7 p. Objective: To develop a sequential sampling plan designed to predict defoliation levels the following summer based on fall egg mass densities.

Abstract: The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a major defoliator of.Douglas fir tussock moths continue to spread across parts of Missoula. But recently, an online warning has been raising concerns about the moth's caterpillars.